Kellogg College Creative Writing Seminar Series: Helen Mort, 22 November 2017

“Failsafe: the value of getting it wrong”

Helen Mort

Mawby Room, Kellogg College,
62 Banbury Road
5 pm (refreshments) for 5.30 pm

All are welcome and no bookings are necessary

Helen Mort was born in Sheffield. She has published two poetry collections with Chatto & Windus, ‘Division Street’ (2013) and ‘No Map Could Show Them’ (2016). She won the Jerwood Aldeburgh Prize for best first collection in 2014. Helen has a volume of short stories forthcoming from Wrecking Ball and a novel forthcoming from Chatto. She is a core creative tutor on Oxford’s MSt in Creative Writing. She also teaches at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Seminar Convenor: Dr Clare Morgan

http://www.kellogg.ox.ac.uk/researchcentres/CW

MSt tutor Helen Mort’s BBC radio commissions, “Millstone” and “Give me Space Beneath my Feet” available to listen to online,on iPlayer

MSt tutor Helen Mort’s two new radio commissions, broadcast on BBC Radio3, are now  available to listen to online on iPlayer:

The Essay – Cornerstones: Millstone    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04n84h6

Between The Ears – Give me Space Beneath my Feet   http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b096g27p (part of last weekend’s ‘Contains Strong Language‘ Festival)

MSt alumna Kent DePinto’s “The Fish that Ate Florida” on BBC World Service’s Life Stories

(Photo: Lionfish in an aquarium, from BBC website)

MSt alumna Kent DePinto’s programme, “The Fish that Ate Florida”, originally on BBC World Service’s Life Stories on 1st October 2017, is now available to listen to online.

From the BBC:

“As part of the BBC Life Stories season, exploring our relationship with the natural world, we travel under the sea in pursuit of a major ecological threat to Western Atlantic coasts – the Lionfish.

The species, which recently spread from its natural territory in the Pacific to Atlantic waters, is aggressive, exotic and very, very hungry. Kent DePinto explores how lionfish went from being an aquarium favourite to the scourge of an aquatic ecosystem as it eats everything in its path – with no natural predators in these seas to control it. She meets the people who have made it their life’s work to eradicate lionfish from Florida waters, in an underwater journey of spears, guns, and survival of the fittest.

Kent explores the tight-knit and sometimes unlikely partnerships of conservationists, scientists, and competitive spear-fishermen and women, as they band together to combat one of the biggest challenges American and Caribbean coral reefs have faced.”

MSt tutor Roopa Farooki to be keynote speaker at the Asian Writer Festival, 21 October, Royal Asiatic Society

MSt tutor Roopa Farooki will be the keynote speaker at the Asian Writer Festival  on 21 October, at the Royal Asiatic Society. Roopa will also be doing a panel on relationships in literary fiction. Twitter link and eventbrite links below.

https://mobile.twitter.com/i/web/status/907529273208078336

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-asian-writer-festival-tickets-37684746090/amp

Rehearsed reading of MSt tutor Ben Brown’s play “The Promise”, London, November 2nd

There will be a rehearsed reading of MSt tutor Ben Brown’s play The Promise on November 2 at the JW3 in Hampstead. The reading will be followed by a panel discussion chaired by Jonathan Freedland,

From the JW3 announcement:

“On the 100th anniversary of the Balfour Declaration, JW3 presents a rehearsed reading of The Promise, a play dramatising this momentous historical moment.

November 2, 1917. The Balfour Declaration is signed, signalling the British government’s support for a national home for the Jewish people in Palestine. It’s the beginning of World War I and Herbert Samuel – the first practising Jew ever to sit in a British Cabinet – dreams of using British power to back a return of the Jews to Palestine. His cousin and fellow Cabinet member, Edwin Montagu, is implacably opposed to the idea. Politics, religion and love collide with explosive effect in Ben Brown’s acclaimed play about the origins of Israel.

Directed by Richard Beecham.”

Visit the webpage for more information and tickets.

 

MSt tutor Helen Mort explores voices from around the world for BBC Radio 4

MSt tutor Helen Mort presents BBC Radio 4’s “Bodies in Motion” series. From the Radio 4 announcement:

The first edition of a new globe-trotting poetry series. Poet Helen Mort explores exciting voices from around the world. This week, she hears poetry in Arabic, German and Spanish while thinking about the phrase ‘Bodies in Motion’: seeing how movement, through space and time, filters through the work of some very different poets.

Helen Mort travels to Paris to meet Syrian poet Golan Haji. He’s drawn inspiration from many sources, including Bill Viola’s video art and a pet ram. Being multilingual, for him, every piece of writing is an act of translation. They meet up with veteran American poet and translator Marilyn Hacker, to hear her version of a Haji poem and talk about the friendship struck up through this translation partnership.

A journey to the centre of the Earth; watching the Berlin Wall fall on a badly tuned TV; and a futuristic German language, have all inspired poems by the compelling German poet and performer, Ulrike Almut Sandig. She tells Helen Mort about her early political ‘guerrilla poetry’ project, ‘eyemail’, which found her pasting poems onto lampposts, and its live performance equivalent, which she calls, ‘earmail’.

Exploring the fascinating process of translating a poem into another language, Helen Mort takes part in a poetry translation workshop at the Poetry Translation Centre in London. In this case, the original Spanish language poem is by Cuban poet Legna Rodriguez, about her experience of moving from Cuba to Miami. Progressing from the line-by-line literal translation towards a version made collectively, involves discussions on cliché and idioms – and on nuances of the noun ‘sofa bed’!

You can listen to the series on the radio or online.